Agenda and draft minutes

Virtual Meeting, Cabinet
Tuesday, 9th February, 2021 6.30 pm

Venue: MS Teams

Contact: Ayshe Simsek, Democratic Services & Scrutiny Manager 

Note: use the link on the agenda front sheet or paste the following into your browser https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3ameeting_ZGZkYzM0MzQtZDllNC00MzQwLWFlMzMtYzIyYjVlMjM2MGVk%40thread.v2/0?context=%7b%22Tid%22%3a%226ddfa760-8cd5-44a8-8e48-d8ca487731c3%22%2c%22Oid%22%3a%2223a26c29-9165-4501-876b-873e129c6319%22%2c%22IsBroadcastMeeting%22%3atrue%7d 

Items
No. Item

425.

FILMING AT MEETINGS

 

Please note that this meeting will be recorded by the Council for live or subsequent broadcast via the Council’s internet site or by anyone attending the meeting using any communication method. Members of the public participating in the meeting (e.g. making deputations, asking questions, making oral protests) should be aware that they are likely to be filmed, recorded or reported on. 

 

 

By entering the meeting, you are consenting to being filmed and to the possible use of those images and sound recordings

Minutes:

The Leader informed all present that the meeting was to be streamed live on the Council’s website.

426.

Apologies

To receive any apologies for absence.

Minutes:

There were no apologies for absence.

427.

Urgent Business

The Chair will consider the admission of any late items of Urgent Business. (Late items of Urgent Business will be considered under the agenda item where they appear. New items of Urgent Business will be dealt with under Item 24 below. New items of exempt business will be dealt with at Item 29 below).

Minutes:

None.

428.

Declarations of Interest

A Member with a disclosable pecuniary interest or a prejudicial interest in a matter who attends a meeting of the authority at which the matter is considered:

 

(i) must disclose the interest at the start of the meeting or when the interest becomes apparent, and

(ii) may not participate in any discussion or vote on the matter and must withdraw from the meeting room.

 

A Member who discloses at a meeting a disclosable pecuniary interest which is not registered in the Register of Members’ Interests or the subject of a pending notification must notify the Monitoring Officer of the interest within 28 days of the disclosure.

 

Disclosable pecuniary interests, personal interests and prejudicial interests are defined at Paragraphs 5-7 and Appendix A of the Members’ Code of Conduct.

Minutes:

None

429.

Notice of Intention to Conduct Business in Private, any Representations Received and the Response to any such Representations

On occasions part of the Cabinet meeting will be held in private and will not be open to the public if an item is being considered that is likely to lead to the disclosure of exempt or confidential information. In accordance with the Local Authorities (Executive Arrangements) (Meetings and Access to Information) (England) Regulations 2012 (the “Regulations”), members of the public can make representations about why that part of the meeting should be open to the public.

 

This agenda contains exempt items as set out at Item [ 25] : Exclusion of the Press and Public.  No representations with regard to these have been received.

 

This is the formal 5 clear day notice under the Regulations to confirm that this Cabinet meeting will be partly held in private for the reasons set out in this Agenda.

 

 

Minutes:

None received.

430.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 310 KB

To confirm and sign the minutes of the meeting held on 19 January 2021 as a correct record.

Minutes:

RESOLVED

 

To approve the minutes of the Cabinet meeting held on 19 January 2021 be approved as a correct record.

431.

Matters Referred to Cabinet by the Overview and Scrutiny Committee

Minutes:

The Scrutiny recommendations on the bduget  would be dealt with at  item 11.

432.

Deputations/Petitions/Questions

To consider any requests received in accordance with Standing Orders.

Minutes:

Deputation in relation to Item 9

 

Karen Matthews and Luke Jordan, Haringey Cycling Campaign and Clean Air Group, and Catherine Kenyon, Haringey Living Streets, addressed the Committee in relation to Item 9 – Draft Walking & Cycling Action Plan Consultation.

 

Ms Matthews stated that it was imperative that the Council took major steps to tackle the damaging and high levels of air pollution in the community. Ms Matthews found walking and cycling to be a more efficient mode of travel, however this was often a frightening experience caused by a high level of traffic, speeding and general lawlessness, especially in St Ann’s Road and Green Lanes. Green Lanes was the hub of the community but was taken up by around 80% parked cars and general traffic. It was felt that there was a need for fewer cars on roads and a change of mind set on the walking and cycling infrastructure, based on international best practice.

 

Ms Matthews referred to the smoking ban, which was introduced in 2007, which had proved to be successful and stated that there was a need for similar drastic measures to be taken to address the issues raised. There were a number of benefits to be gained, including helping to reduce the impact on the NHS and creating a better community for everyone.

 

Mr Jordan stated that cycling was an essential part of his life cycling and his primary form of transport. However, given his level of experience of cycling he still felt unsafe on the roads and it was often a leap of faith too far for many. He felt that all children should be able to cycle to school safely. He had numerous friends with asthma, a condition which was made worse by illegal levels of air pollution. Moving between neighbouring boroughs, he suggested that their infrastructure felt better managed and safer. Mr Jordan stressed the importance of promoting people’s health over the convenience of drivers and asked Members to take responsibility and promote the health of our youth as a priority.

 

Ms Kenyon gave a statement from Haringey Living Streets, in support of the Walking & Cycling Action Plan. Ms Kenyon stated that the purpose of the action plan went beyond walking and cycling and was about the future of Haringey, the recovery from the pandemic, the health and wellbeing of residents and an urgent response to the climate emergency. It was important to look at what legacy Members wanted to leave the children of Haringey and that it was not beyond the realms of possibility that every child could have a safe walking/cycling route to school.

 

It was noted that there had been a 20% increase in car journeys within the borough and there was a need for everyone to play a part in delivering the action plan, in order to deliver real change in the borough and bring the community together. Ms Kenyon stated that she would also like to see air quality monitoring undertaken across the borough, with this data shared,  ...  view the full minutes text for item 432.

433.

Draft Walking & Cycling Action Plan Consultation pdf icon PDF 552 KB

[Report of the Director for Housing, Regeneration and Planning. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Planning and Corporate Services.]

 

Cabinet are requested to provide approval to consult on a Draft Walking & Cycling Action Plan.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Planning and Corporate Services introduced the report which sought approval for the draft Walking and Cycling Action Plan (WCAP). It was explained that the WCAP was a commitment set out in the 2018 Transport Strategy and it aimed to establish a reputation for Haringey as a walking and cycling borough, to ensure that more journeys were taken on foot and by bicycle, and to increase active travel to improve the wellbeing of residents, reduce obesity, and improve air quality.

 

It was noted that the WCAP had five central aspirations: to increase active travel, policies on walking, policies on cycling, delivering low traffic neighbourhoods, and reallocating road space to enable sustainable growth and to make walking and cycling safer. The Cabinet Member for Planning and Corporate Services explained that the WCAP set out a hierarchy of modes with pavement users at the top, followed by cyclists, public transport, electric vehicles, and motor vehicles. Once the WCAP was in place, it would be possible to reallocate road space to higher priority groups. It was noted that there was a delivery plan attached to the WCAP which set out proposals for a number of cycle routes, Low Traffic Neighbourhoods (LTNs), and walking and cycling projects.

 

The Cabinet Member for Planning and Corporate Services outlined that the WCAP aimed to reduce the number of journeys made by car to address the climate and inactivity crises, to prevent deaths on the road, and to assist green recovery from Covid-19 and benefit high streets and the local economy. It was noted that, by enabling people to walk and cycle more easily, neighbourhoods would be safer, there would be less pollution, and the area would be a better place to live and work. It was also considered that the impact of pollution and safety disproportionately affected lower income residents and the WCAP aimed to reduce these impacts.

 

The Leader commented that he was very supportive of the fact that the WCAP had deliverables and practical steps. Cllr Chandwani added that the plan acknowledged some elements that were unique to Haringey and celebrated the borough.

 

Following questions from Cllr Bull, Cllr Palmer, Cllr Brabazon, and Cllr Rossetti, the following information was provided:

 

           It was acknowledged that there were differences between motorcycle, scooter, and car use in terms of road safety and carbon emissions. The Cabinet Member for Planning and Corporate Services noted that he would consider this point and that the hierarchy for modes of transport may be amended to reflect this.

           In relation to funding and delivery, it was confirmed that the WCAP did not exclusively rely on external funding. It was explained that £5.1 million of capital funding had been allocated in the capital programme, £2 million of funding had been secured from Transport for London (TfL), and £1.9 million was expected from Local Implementation Plan (LIP) funding.

           It was noted that the delivery of the WCAP, including LTNs, would be decided based on the 10 criteria for prioritisation  ...  view the full minutes text for item 433.

434.

Renaming of Albert Road Recreation Ground pdf icon PDF 364 KB

[ Report of the Director of Environment and Neighbourhoods. To be introduced by the Leader of the Council.]

 

Report on the consultation with local residents about the proposal to rename Albert Road Recreation Ground to O.R. Tambo Recreation Ground.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Leader of the Council introduced the report which sought approval to change the name of the Albert Road Recreation Ground (ARRG) to O.R. Tambo Recreation Ground. The decision reflected the long and historical relationship that Oliver Tambo had with the area, and one that was reflective of the borough’s values, culture and diversity. The Leader added that place names, street names and statues did matter, and as a society those who were chosen to be commemorated and celebrated reflected the value placed on those people and the communities they represent. It served to reinforce the belief that their life achievements could be a role model for others. The Leader stated that whilst changing the name of a park or street would not eradicate social injustice on its own, it was a tangible step which would ultimately lead to wider change.

 

Cabinet Members commended the recommendation in the report and echoed the Leader’s comments.

 

In response to questions from Councillor Palmer, the Leader advised that:

  • The additional data referred to but not included in the report could be circulated.
  • A formal process would be set up for further consultations on place and street renaming.

 

RESOLVED

 

  1. Tonote that a six-week public consultation was carried out between 9 October and 23 November 2020, on the proposal to change the name of the ARRG to O.R. Tambo Recreational Ground, and to consider the responses received and set out in paragraphs 6.14 and 6.15 of this report.

 

2.     To agree to rename the park known as the “Albert Road Recreation Ground” (and shown edged red on the plan attached at Appendix 1) to “O.R. Tambo Recreation Ground”, re-enforcing the borough’s strong beliefs of diversity as set out in the Borough Plan, and in recognition of O.R. Tambo’s historical achievements in fighting apartheid; and

 

 

3.     To agree to update the deed of dedication to “Queen Elizabeth II Field O.R. Tambo Recreation Ground”.

 

Reasons for decision

 

On 9 June 2020, the Mayor of London announced a Commission for Diversity in the Public Realmto review and improve the diversity across London’s public realm to ensure the capital’s landmarks suitably reflect London’s achievements and diversity.

 

As a response to the Black Lives Matter movement and protests, on 12 June 2020, the Leader of Haringey Council announced a Review of Monuments, Building, Place and Street Names in Haringey.

 

For a number of years, it has been suggested that the ARRG located in Albert Road, N22 is renamed to reflect the proud and long-standing history that the ARRG has with O.R. Tambo, in turn reflecting the values that make Haringey the vibrant, inclusive and multi-cultural borough it is.

 

Although this decision sits out of the wider Review of Monuments, Building, Place and Street Names in Haringey, renaming is being considered under the same ethos for change. It is also felt that now is the right time to harness that engagement and willingness to increase the borough’s diversity and will contribute to a number of strategic outcomes detailed  ...  view the full minutes text for item 434.

435.

2021/22 Budget and 2021-2026 MTFS Report pdf icon PDF 16 MB

[Report of the Director of Finance. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Finance and Strategic Regeneration.]

 

Following public consultation and Scrutiny Review, this report will set out the details of the proposed budget for 2021/22 and MTFS through to 2025/26, including savings, growth and capital proposals. The report will also set out details of funding for 2021/22 and if available the remainder of the planning period and highlight areas of risk. The report will be for onward approval by Full Council on the 22 of February, and will include the details of the council tax resolution.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Leader invited the second deputation from Paul Burnham, representing Haringey Defend Council Housing, to put forward his representations, in relation to the Budget report.

 

Mr Burnham began his representations by commending the Council for the role they played with tenant campaigners, in influencing a change of policy, by the Mayor London, to now use funding from government on all social rents. This was included in the next iteration of the affordable housing programme in London.

 

Mr Burnham called for a Council programme of converting affordable rent back to real Council rents and commented that this policy change did not feature in the current budget. He referred to the Budget report which advised that affordable rent tenants will have a social rent cap. However, this was still £50 a week above the current Council rent rates for a 2-bedroom property. Mr Burnham raised concern about the implications in the Budget report that the rule on the social rent cap was being applied to new homes being in the borough. He referred to government mandatory policy on social rent setting and having to use the rent formula. He further contested this formula as studies showed that, even after taking into account the higher house prices in the borough and having social rent outcomes, this would not provide the affordability needed for tenants. This could cause future issues for the Council with tenants who may not want their homes demolished to face higher rents in their new properties.

 

Mr Burnham continued to speak on:

  • The service charges for tenants which were being taken forward without any consultation.
  • Issues with the converted properties related to cleaning charges. Homes for Haringey having to refund a lot of the charges up to March of this year. The charges were 60% higher than they should be and there was a request that they be corrected.
  • The need for financial reports, presented by Homes for Haringey, to show itemised service charge expenditure which they did not at present.
  • Homes for Haringey to open their accounts and empower tenants and leaseholders to input on rent setting and service charges.

 

Mr Burnham concluded by requesting a meeting with the Cabinet Member for Housing and Estate Renewal to discuss these two key issues raised in the deputation on social rent setting and tenants and leaseholder cleaning charges.

 

The Leader invited the Cabinet Member for Housing and Estate Renewal to respond to the deputation and the following information was provided.

 

  • Haringey rents were set in line with government guidance as prescribed by rent standards. The government allowed English local authorities to increase their rents by CPI + 1%. For 2021/22, rents would therefore increase by no more than 1.5%, with the average rent increase for 2021/2022 being £1.57 per week. These were for rents which are currently below formula rent.

 

  • Formula rent was not just based on property value but also on number of bedrooms and average earnings in the local area. Haringey rents were in line with these.

 

436.

Local Welfare Assistance Fund pdf icon PDF 411 KB

[Report of the Director for Customers, Transformation and Resources. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Transformation and Public Realm Investment.]

 

Cabinet are requested to agree the policy for Local Welfare Assistance Fund.

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Transformation and Public Realm Investment introduced the report which sought approval for the introduction of a Local Welfare Assistance Scheme. The scheme would be included as part of a suite of support available in the borough focusing on residents who face short-term financial hardship.

 

The Leader commented that the implementation of the Scheme would be an achievement that the Council could be proud of.

 

In response to questions from Councillor Palmer, the Cabinet Member advised that:

  • It was important that approval be given to the Director of Customers, Transformation and Resources in consultation with the Cabinet Member for Transformation and Public Realm Investment to make minor amendments to the scheme as it would allow for the Council to be agile in its’ response to demand. All decisions within the scheme would be subject to financial checks.
  • Work was being carried out to identify buffer points to allow for an equal spread of funding across the year. This was not the first discretionary fund that had been implemented by the Council, and experience could be drawn from the implementation of these.

 

RESOLVED

 

1.         To agree the approach to introducing a Local Welfare Assistance Scheme set out in this report, which will be known as the Haringey Support Fund.

 

2.         To agree the principles and proposed scope of the scheme as set out in paragraphs 6.4 to 6.7.

 

3.         To agree that approval of the final operational detail of the scheme and final public policy document – which will follow the approach agreed in recommendation 3.1 b) – should be delegated to the Director of Customers, Transformation and Resources in consultation with the Cabinet Member for Transformation and Public Realm Investment.

 

4.         To note that the Council will monitor the design and impact of the scheme and regularly review our approach, including through a review at the end of the first year of funding. Minor amendments to the detail of the scheme, where required, should be delegated to the Director of Customers, Transformation and Resources in consultation with the Cabinet Member for Transformation and Public Realm Investment.

 

Reasons for decision

 

Ongoing structural inequalities in the borough have been amplified by the impact of Covid-19. In this precarious environment, the economic realities mean that many residents are more vulnerable than previously to acute financial shocks and are at risk of falling into crisis. Although the Council does not hold all the levers to tackle these challenges, and providing social security remains the responsibility of Central Government, it is more important than ever that we find new ways to support our residents.

 

Although the challenge in Haringey is ongoing, this year, in particular, many residents are likely to face increased pressures due to ongoing high levels of unemployment coupled with the gradual winding down of Central Government support schemes, such as the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) and the temporary Universal Credit (UC) uplift. Whilst it is not the role of local government to replace these schemes, introducing a  ...  view the full minutes text for item 436.

437.

Debt Strategy pdf icon PDF 232 KB

[Report of the Director for Customers, Transformation and Resources. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Transformation and Public Realm Investment]

 

It is recommended that Cabinet:

a) Agree the approach to reducing debt amongst Haringey residents set out in the Debt Strategy. 

b) Authorise officers to undertake consultation with external stakeholders on the Debt Strategy [with a view to final publication in June].

Additional documents:

Minutes:

 

 

The Cabinet Member for Transformation and Public Realm investment introduced the report which set out the Haringey Strategy for tackling debt, the purpose of which was to set out the levers the Council use, working with partners, to help residents avoid and mitigate problematic debt.

 

The Cabinet Member spoke about the stark inequalities in the borough with increased hardship and families struggling on low incomes with universal credit and low paid jobs. There were added new pressures to be faced with the furlough scheme coming to an end, unemployment, unsustainable housing coupled with a general uncertain economic situation.

 

The Cabinet Member spoke about the detrimental circumstances of debt and the far-reaching consequences it had with overwhelming negative impact on life chances and mental health. She spoke about the importance of preventing the spiralling of debt for individuals and families by creating and providing supportive economic and social conditions in the borough.

 

The Cabinet Member expressed that individuals and families in debt should be viewed as a potential safeguarding issue to prevent, rather than a collection of costs to pursue. Council services needed to understand if  individuals and families had enough food to eat before paying the debt owed.

 

The proposed strategy was transformative and proactive providing support to residents in new ways, in light of the impact of Covid and worsening economic situation. The strategy would further enable the Council to work smartly on prevention of debt through co-ordinating services and projects.

 

In response to questions from Cllr Palmer, the following was noted:

 

  • With regards to forecasting loss of debt recovery, it was predominantly in the Council’s interest to help people not get to a position where they are able to pay their bills and not encounter a spiralling debt situation. From considering other borough’s similar work on this, the Council would be offsetting the debt recovery loss with an income rise. It was further noted that there was an estimated £16billion of unclaimed welfare support in the country. Newcastle City Council had taken forward a similar strategy with a focus on benefit maximisation , helping increase the income into the Council by £13m.
  • Noted the general significant difficulties in understanding the benefit system and the ingenuity, patience and navigation skills required to understand entitlements to benefits and to make claims. Part of the Council’s ‘Here to Help’ scheme would help residents understand what they are entitled to and how to access this.

 

  • The partners were not listed as the strategy was changing and setting  the agenda for whole borough. This covered all partners in the borough, including organisations, individuals, schools, faith congregations and the voluntary sector and was enabling them to identify that a person or family had debt issues and the potential for this situation to escalate. They had a responsibility to signpost  to organisations such as the Citizen’s Advice Bureau, relevant Council staff , and the benefit maximisation scheme.

 

RESOLVED

 

To agree the approach to preventing and mitigating debt amongst Haringey residents set out in the Haringey  ...  view the full minutes text for item 437.

438.

Debt Reduction Policy pdf icon PDF 399 KB

[Report of the Director for Customers, Transformation and Resources. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Cabinet Member for Transformation and Public Realm Investment.]

 

It is recommended that Cabinet:

a) Agree the approach to reducing debt amongst Haringey residents set out in this report. 

b) Approve the Debt Reduction Policy, which sets out our approach to debt owed to the Council, and note that officials will return with a further action plan.  

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Transformation and Public Realm Investment introduced the report which set out the Council’s Ethical Debt Reduction Policy. The policy set out the Council’s approach to debt owed to the Council in preparation for the introduction of the Debt Respite Scheme legislation due to come in to force in May 2021. The policy would ensure that the Council would be able to offer residents direct support and guidance in an ethical, appropriate, and compassionate way.

 

The Cabinet Member advised that she had met with the Director for Customers, Transformation and Resources to begin the process of recruitment to the additional posts required.

 

RESOLVED

 

To approve the Ethical Debt Reduction Policy, at Appendix 1, which sets out the approach to debt owed to the Council.

 

Reasons for decision

 

Problematic debt profoundly impacts on both the day-to-day lives and long-term life chances of residents struggling with it. It was a significant issue before Covid-19, but the impact of the pandemic has been to push many more of our residents into unmanageable and problem debt.

 

The case is clear that Haringey residents are facing increasing challenges to meet household financial pressures, and that more needs to be done to help local people to meet these challenges.

 

The Council has a legal and fiduciary duty to collect debt and raise funds for vital public services, while supporting residents and encouraging an open dialogue about debt and financial resilience. the Council wants all practice around debt collection to be ethical, meaning we will act appropriately, proportionally and with compassion.

 

This policy sets out the principles that will underpin the Council’s ethical approach to reducing the debt it is owed. It should be read in conjunction with the wider Haringey Tackling Debt Strategy, which sets out the Council’s proposed system wide approach to reducing debt and promoting financial security in the borough.

 

Alternative options considered.

 

Do Nothing

The Council would not take steps to implement an Ethical Debt Reduction Policy. This would curtail the possibility of achieving our objective of reducing debt amongst Haringey residents. This may also have a negative consequence on the public purse, with high levels of debt likely to lead to lower Council revenues and higher use of public services. It would mean that the Council would not implement Fairness Commission recommendation referenced at para 4.

 

Adopt an ethical debt reduction policy based on different principles and ways of working.

The issues outlined in this paper might be addressed through a policy based on different principles and ways or working, but the proposed approach set out in this paper is based on evidence of what works and good practice from elsewhere.

 

Clerks note: The Cabinet Member for Local Investment and Economic Growth left the meeting at 20:50.

439.

Admission to Schools - Determined Arrangements for 2022/23 pdf icon PDF 444 KB

 

[Report of the Director of Children's Services. To be introduced by the Deputy Leader of the Council and Cabinet Member for Children, Education and Families]

 

Following public consultation held between November 2020 and January 2021, Cabinet is asked to determine the admission arrangements for admission to community nursery, primary, junior and secondary schools and to St Aidan’s Voluntary Controlled school and for sixth form admission for the year 2022/23.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

 The Cabinet Member for Children, Education and Families introduced the report which set out the statutory requirements to determine the proposed admission arrangements for the school year 2022/23. These arrangements were in respect of the borough’s community and voluntary controlled (VC) schools.

 

Cabinet was asked to agree to their publication on or before 15 March 2021 on the Council’s website with such details to include advice on the right of objection to the Schools Adjudicator.

 

This year there was no change proposed to our admission arrangements for community and voluntary controlled (VC) apart from a slight alteration to the In-year fair access protocol as set out in the report.

 

In response to a question from Cllr Brabazon, it was noted that, in the Covid period, lots of families had moved out of the borough. It was estimated that, in London, the equivalent of two medium sized London boroughs of residents had left and this would have an impact, not just on school admissions, but on other services used by children and families. There was a year to work out the impact and continue to assess the changing situation and how to adapt and change Council plans for school admissions in the coming year.

 

RESOLVED

 

1.         To approve the Council’s admission arrangements for the academic year 2022/23 as set out in Appendices 1 – 4.

 

2.         To agree the in-year fair access protocol (IYFAP) as set out in Appendix 5 to come into force from 1 March 2021.

 

3.         To agree that the determined arrangements for all maintained primary and secondary schools in the borough are published on the Council’s website by 15 March 2021 with an explanation of the right of any person or body, under the School Admissions (Admission Arrangements and Co-ordination of Admission Arrangements) Regulations 2012, to object to the Schools Adjudicator in specified circumstances[1].

 

Reasons for decision

 

The School Admissions Code 2014 requires all admission authorities to determine admission arrangements every year, even if they have not changed from previous years. Regulation 17 of the School Admissions Regulations 2012 also requires admission authorities to determine admission arrangements by 28 February in the determination year.

 

In addition, the Regulations require the admission authority (in this case the local authority) to publish on its website by 15 March in the determining year the determined arrangements of all maintained primary and secondary school and academies in the borough, advising the right to object to the Schools Adjudicator, where it is considered that the arrangement do not comply with the mandatory provisions of the School Admissions Code 2014.

 

The Council consults on its admission arrangements annually irrespective of whether or not there is a proposed change to the arrangements. This is to ensure transparency and openness on the contents of the admission arrangements and to allow all stakeholders to make representations which can then be considered as part of the determination of the arrangements.

 

Alternative options considered.

 

This year we did not propose a change to the oversubscription criteria  ...  view the full minutes text for item 439.

440.

Asset Management Plan Update pdf icon PDF 253 KB

 

[Report of the Director for Housing, Regeneration and Planning. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Finance and Strategic Regeneration.]

 

Cabinet are asked to approve the Asset Management Plan 2020 – 2025 Update - February 2021, previously agreed at February 2020 Cabinet.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Finance and Strategic Regeneration introduced the report which sought approval for the adoption of the Council’s 2021 update of the Asset Management Plan (AMP) for 2020-25. The AMP was an important tool in achieving the Council’s Borough Plan ambitions. It formed part of the capital strategy and was the context for capital investment decisions, setting out major initiatives and priorities for capital investment, as well as investment required for compliance and carbon management planning. The plan also included the Acquisitions and Disposals Policy.

 

In response to questions from Councillors Palmer and Gordon, the Cabinet Member advised that:

  • Due to the Covid pandemic, evaluations had been carried out in relation to the civic presence in the borough and the decision had been made that refurbishment of the Civic Centre site would provide better value for money than to develop on the Wood Green library site. The refurbished Civic Centre would be a valuable asset to the Council.
  • No decision had been made on the redevelopment of the Civic Centre car park.
  • The AMP set out the Acquisition and Disposals Policy and the process which would be followed. There were no targets in terms of how many assets would be acquired or disposed of.
  • Details of the number of tenancies taken up in Shaftesbury House would be provided in writing to Councillor Gordon.

 

RESOLVED

 

To approve the updated Asset Management Plan 2020-2025 (“AMP”) as included at Appendix 1 including the updated Acquisitions and Disposals Policy and the updated Commercial Property Portfolio Strategy.

 

Reasons for decision

 

The Council’s Asset Management Plan (AMP) sits alongside the Capital Strategy and is a key document in supporting the Council’s decision making about investment in its land and property assets to deliver Council priorities and services.

 

CIPFA (Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountability) guidance advises Councils to agree an Asset Management Plan as part of their budget strategy from 2020/21. CIPFA’s guidance on asset management includes ensuring that Councils regularly review their need for property either operationally or strategically.

 

The Council’s Asset Management Plan 2020-25 was agreed in February 2020. At the time Cabinet was advised that it would be updated after one year as their would-be significant progress and change over the course of the year to require an update. It is important that the plan is updated regularly to ensure it is useful in supporting capital investment decisions which will deliver the Council’s Borough Plan and MTFS priorities.

 

Alternative Options

 

The Council’s Asset Management Plan lasts for five years and can be refreshed periodically. If this does not happen, the plan will not reflect the most recent changes and the plan will not be as helpful in development the Council’s budget strategy.

 

441.

Neighbourhood Moves Scheme pdf icon PDF 323 KB

[Report of the Director for Housing, Regeneration and Planning. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Housing and Estate Renewal.]

 

Following consultation, Cabinet will be asked to agree an amendment to the Council's Allocations Policy to allow for the Neighbourhood Moves Scheme to be applied for new Council homes built or acquired by the Council, allowing Secure Tenants living nearby first priority for these homes.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Housing and Estate Renewal introduced the report which set out the Neighbourhood Moves Scheme. This had been consulted on and was put forward for approval. This scheme would provide existing Council tenants priority for new homes that are built in their neighbourhood, in particular those who were living in homes which are too big or too small. The design of the scheme also meant that those on the waiting list would also benefit from new homes with each local tenant moving and releasing an existing home which would be let to those on the waiting list.

 

The Cabinet Member outlined that this meant building new Council homes, benefiting two households for each new home, and adding to the Council’s overall housing stock for future generations.

 

The Cabinet Member was pleased to report that there was very strong support for the scheme, with 73% of respondents strongly supporting the policy and a further 23% in favour with some small amendments.

 

The Cabinet Member reiterated that the Council were committed to building a new generation of Council homes, and this programme is well underway, with sites for potential new Council housing identified across the whole borough. The Council wanted to use this opportunity to strengthen local communities, and to ensure that households who are not adequately housed could live in homes which met their needs.

 

In response to a question from Cllr Tucker, the Cabinet Member confirmed that existing tenants keep their secure tenancies and remain on Council target rents.

 

RESOLVED

 

1.      To note the Equalities Impact Assessment at Appendix 1.

 

2.      To note the consultation results attached in a full report at Appendix 2.

 

3.         To approve the alterations to the Housing Allocations Policy attached at Appendix 3 and the Neighbourhood Moves Scheme attached at Appendix 4 which will be attached to the Housing Allocations Policy.

 

Reasons for decision

 

The proposed changes are informed by the results of a consultation with those who would be affected by the proposals. The Neighbourhood Moves Scheme seeks to address over-crowding by releasing larger family homes which are under-occupied and by allowing over-crowded households to move locally. It will also ensure that local secure Council tenants who have been affected by building works are given the opportunity to benefit from new homes built near them, and support community cohesion.

 

Alternative options considered.

 

Not to make any changes to the draft Neighbourhood Moves Scheme following the consultation: this option was rejected since consultees had strong views on some aspects of the draft Neighbourhood Moves Scheme which were able to be incorporated into the final Neighbourhood Moves Scheme.

 

To make other changes to the draft Neighbourhood Moves Scheme following the consultation: other changes could have been made; a full discussion of the changes proposed and those considered but not adopted can be found in this report and in Appendix 2.

 

To not adopt the Neighbourhood Moves Scheme: this was rejected since the consultation showed strong support for the Neighbourhood Moves Scheme and the  ...  view the full minutes text for item 441.

442.

Contract variation with Central North West London NHS Foundation Trust (CNWL) for the contract for loats 1a - Genito-Urinary Medicine (GUM) Services pdf icon PDF 431 KB

[ Report of the Director for Public Health. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Adults and Health.]

 

Contract variation to the service which covers the need to implement new tariffs and align the contract to financial years, implementation of an addendum to the integrated sexual health specification in regards to commissioning responsibilities of PrEP  transferring to Local Authorities and other local service changes specific to Barnet, Camden & Islington.

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Adults and Health introduced the report which sought approval for a number of changes required within the North Central London (NCL) sexual health contract awarded to Central North West London NHS Foundation Trust and wider London partners, as part of ongoing service development, response to the impact of COVID on service provision and other service changes including responsibilities to deliver PrEP for the prevention of HIV.

 

In response to questions from Councillor Palmer, Dr Will Maimaris advised that the uptake of PrEP had not been as high as expected, however work was being undertaken to ensure that availability of PrEP would be communicated to those in the borough who required it.

 

RESOLVED

 

To approve the contract variation to the Central and North West NHS Trust contract for lots 1a - Genito-Urinary Medicine (GUM) services to enable the following contract variations to be implemented;

 

1.      Introduction of new activity baseline for Rest of London (RoL) for 2020/21

 

2.      As set out in paragraphs 6.5.1 and 6.5.2, to agree the annual lump sum payment of £218,402 to Haringey council for routine PrEP commissioning.

 

3.         A change to service level at the Barnet clinic and some one-off investment spend to support patient access.

 

4.         Implementation of new and changed tariffs for sexual and reproductive services delivered across London.

 

5.         One off investment in 2019/20 to CNWL by London Boroughs of Camden and Islington for localised sexual & reproductive health initiatives.

 

Reasons for decision

 

The contract variation required in this report is specific to Lot 1a and forms the wider variation to the service contract which covers the need to revise CNWL baseline activities for RoL, implement new and changed tariffs, align the contract to financial years which was discussed and agreed by NCL commissioners and CNWL and make provision for the funding of PreP service via local authorities.

 

The NCL Integrated Sexual Health (NCLISH) services are provided by Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust (CNWL).

 

The Haringey lot 1a - Genito-Urinary Medicine (GUM) contract for clinic based services commenced on 3 July 2017, in partnership with Barnet, Camden & Islington for a period of five (5) years (with an option to extend for a further 3 years on contract extensions of one (1) year each).  For Haringey, the initial 5-year contract term is estimated to cost £7,963,771 million. Adding the option to extend the contract for 3 further periods of one year each at an estimated cost of £1,608,073 million for each of these years brings the maximum total estimated cost of the contract to £12,787,991 million.

 

Pre Exposure Prophylaxis (PreP) funding allocation has been approved and was transferred to Local Authorities October 2020. For Haringey, the annual value will be £218,402.

 

 

 

Alternative options considered

 

This is a mandated open access service. Service transformation has already realised significant savings and transferred the previous sexual health services into an integrated system across the NCL sector. This is an activity and tariff based contract,  ...  view the full minutes text for item 442.

443.

Award of contract for the provision of bundled hours home support and reablement service pdf icon PDF 321 KB

[Report of the Director of Adults and Health. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Adults and Health]

 

 

Award of  contract for small number of providers  to deliver  Home Support & Reablement bundled  hours across the different localities Borough wide.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Adults and Health introduced the report which set out the outcome of a mini-competition tender process conducted via the Council’s Dynamic Purchasing System (DPS) for Home Support and Reablement Services and sought approval to award a ‘Call-Off’ contract (referred to as a Service Agreement) to the successful Providers in accordance with the Contract Standing Order 9.07.1(d).

 

Service Agreements were proposed to be awarded for a period of 29 months commencing from 12th April 2021 to 31st August 2023 with an option to extend for further period of up to two (2) years. The estimated cost of the service for 29 months was set out in the report.

 

The Cabinet Member emphasised that this proposed decision was an important step in a process to transform home support in Haringey, recognising the critical role it played in enabling people to live in their homes for as long and as well as possible.

 

The Cabinet Member outlined that by offering London Living Wage to all front-line care workers, the Council were honouring their commitment to the Ethical Care Charter and recognising the importance of care workers – their status and their value – in the delivery of home support. The Council were continuing to recognise that for the majority of people the experience of home support is their experience of social care – representing a real opportunity to make the necessary changes when people are at their frailest and vulnerable.

 

In response to questions from Councillor Palmer, the following was noted:

 

Locality working was at the heart of this strategy and issues around travelling around visits would be reduced and provide a better working experience. The Cabinet Member agreed with Councillor Palmer on the provision of sick pay to carers, but this was reliant on national government funding. There had been campaign for sick pay for care workers and increasing levels of sick pay for people on low incomes. These issues had been raised with ministers in writing by the Council.

 

The Council were seeking to improve the quality of care offered and not reduce the hours provided of personal care. The nature of care has been transformed over the last year and the contracts recognised this as there were lots of ways of delivering care and improving quality of care.

 

The co- design group process had started with the RSA and LGA working with the Council  to consider innovative ways of designing services which involved  a range of   stakeholders including: frontline care workers, council staff and local residents.  This led to the proposals for ‘working  together differently’ and there then continued to  have stakeholder meetings  to ensure there was the right offer  linked to localities. There were regular reports to the ASC design group with work continuing with users on improving locality working, ensuring the residents had access to the same  regular carer who lived locally and ensuring links to existing  services in localities.

 

[At 9.40pm the Leader moved to invoke Committee Standing Order 63 which was the  ...  view the full minutes text for item 443.

444.

Commercial Property Portfolio Review - Industrial Property Strategy and proposed acquisition of third party interest pdf icon PDF 537 KB

[Report of the Director for Housing, Regeneration and Planning. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Finance and Strategic Regeneration.]

 

Cabinet is asked to approve the Commercial Property Portfolio review including the approval to pursue the acquisition of a number of third party industrial interests.

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Finance and Strategic Regeneration introduced the report which sought approval for the strategy for the commercial industrial portfolio, which aimed to ensure that the Council’s industrial portfolio aligned with the Council’s economic plans as set out in the Good Economy Recovery Plan and the Borough Plan. it also sought approval to take steps to buy-back 6 long leasehold interests and two Freehold interests in a total of 8 industrial properties. All potential acquisitions would be subject to third party agreements, the Council’s Acquisitions and Disposals Policy, and to be in accordance with financial thresholds and further analysis.

 

In response to questions from Councillor Gordon, it was advised that:

-           The cost per acquisition was provided in the open part of the report and the payback period was set out in the exempt report. As this was an umbrella report, further reports would be provided to Cabinet to seek approval for future acquisitions.

 

Following consideration of the exempt information  at item 28, it was

 

RESOLVED

 

1.        To approve the strategy for the commercial industrial portfolio as set out in the open and the exempt report which aims to ensure the Council’s industrial portfolio is aligned with the Council’s economic plans as set out in the Good Economy Recovery Plan and the Borough Plan.

 

2.         To approve that steps are taken to seek to buy-back 6 long leasehold interests as set out in the exempt report and two Freehold interests in a total of 8 industrial properties forming part of the Council’s commercial property portfolio, subject to agreement with the third part interests, and subject to the disposals and acquisitions policy criteria being met. All potential acquisitions to also meet the Council’s acquisition criteria set out in 6.12 below, and to be in accordance with the financial thresholds and further analysis required as set out in the Exempt report.

 

3.         To note that on provisionally agreeing terms to acquire each of the third party interests a full business case to be brought to Cabinet for approval to the acquisition within the agreed budgetary framework.

 

Reasons for decision

 

As part of the Council’s Asset Management Plan the commercial portfolio is under review to ensure that it is performing well financially and to ensure that it is possible to maximise its impact on the socio-economic well-being of the Borough. The industrial portfolio includes some established industrial estates and properties. This review covers eight of the industrial properties where it may be possible to increase the Council’s income and improve the Council’s ability to use these properties to support future economic growth and achieve planning aims, in particular in the Tottenham area.

 

Haringey is an established location for small and medium scale manufacturing activities. There is a strong demand for industrial properties nationwide and this sector of the property market is set to continue to be buoyant. The industrial property market in Haringey reflects this strong performance. This supports business growth and employment in the Borough.

 

Occupation of the Council’s industrial  ...  view the full minutes text for item 444.

445.

Approval of construction contract at Antill Road Car Park - Land between 39-41 Antill Road N15 pdf icon PDF 238 KB

[Report of the Director for Housing, Regeneration and Planning. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Housing and Estate Renewal.]

 

The report will ask Cabinet to 1) Approve the appointment of the recommended contractor to complete a development of one new Council rented home at Antill Road N15, 2) approve the appropriation of the land at Antill Road from housing purposes to planning purposes and back from planning purposes to housing purposes after practical completion under the relevant Sections of the Local Government Act 1972 and 1985, 3) Approve the use of the Council’s powers under Section 203 of the Housing and Planning Act 2016 to override easements and other rights of neighbouring properties infringed upon the development.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Housing and Estate Renewal introduced the report which sought Cabinet’s approval, considering consultation with local residents, to build a new three-bedroom Council home for Council rent on Council land that is currently in use for car parking.

 

To achieve this, Cabinet were being asked to agree that the Council should appropriate the land, first for planning purposes and then on completion for housing purposes; and in light of a formal tender process to award a construction contract to a locally based firm, Cuttle Construction Limited.

 

Further to considering exempt information at item 29,

 

RESOLVED

 

1.         To consider the responses to the consultation carried out on this proposed scheme in line with section 105 of the Housing Act 1985, as set out in paragraphs 6.5 to 6.8 of this report.

 

2.         To approve the appointment of Cuttle Construction Limited to undertake the new build works to provide a total of one Council rented home at Antill Road for a total contract sum of £274,202 and to approve the client contingency sum set out in the exempt part of the report.

 

3.         To approve the appropriation of the land at Antill Road (edged red in the plans attached at Appendix 1) from housing purposes to planning purposes under Section 122 of the Local Government Act 1972 as it is no longer required for the purpose which it is currently held, and for the purpose of carrying out development as set out in part 6 of this report.

 

4.         To approve the use of the Council’s powers under Section 203 of the Housing and Planning Act 2016 to override easements and other rights of neighbouring properties infringed upon by the Antill Road development, under planning permission Ref: HGY/2020/1480.

 

5.         To delegate to the Director of Housing, Regeneration and Planning, after consultation with the Director of Finance and the Cabinet Member for Housing and Estate Renewal, authority to make payments of compensation as a result of any infringement arising from the development and the recommendation 3.1.3, within the existing scheme of delegation.

 

6.         To approve the appropriation of the land at Antill Road (edged red in the plans attached at Appendix 1) from planning purposes back to housing purposes under Section 19 of the Housing Act 1985, after practical completion of the development.

 

Reasons for decisions

 

The land at Antill Road was approved by Cabinet in July 2019 to be included in the Council’s housing delivery programme. The scheme has subsequently been granted planning consent and is ready to progress to construction. This report therefore marks the third, and final, Members’ decision to develop on this site.

 

Cuttle Construction Limited has been identified by a formal tender process to undertake these works.

 

The appropriation of the site for planning purposes is required as it will allow the Council to use the powers contained in Section 203 to override easements and other rights of neighbouring properties and will prevent injunctions that could delay or prevent the Council’s proposed development. Section  ...  view the full minutes text for item 445.

446.

Minutes of Other Bodies pdf icon PDF 541 KB

To note the minutes of the following:

 

Cabinet Member Signing 15 January 2021.

Minutes:

RESOLVED

 

To note the minutes  of the  Cabinet Signing held on the 15 January  2021.

447.

Significant and Delegated Actions pdf icon PDF 332 KB

To note the significant and delegated decisions taken by Directors in January 2021.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Noted that Councillor Gordon would  write to the Director for Housing , Planning and Regeneration to  put forward queries on the delegated decisions in relation to the Tottenham area.

 

RESOLVED

 

To note the delegated decisions taken by Directors.

448.

New Items of Urgent Business

To consider any items admitted at Item 3 above.

Minutes:

None

449.

Exclusion of the Press and Public

Note from the Democratic Services and Scrutiny Manager

 

Items 26, 27, 28 , 29 ,allow for consideration of exempt information in relation to items 19, 20, 21, and 6.

 

 

TO RESOLVE

 

 That the press and public be excluded from the remainder of the meeting as the items below, contain exempt information, as defined under paragraph 3 and 5, Part 1, schedule 12A of the Local Government Act:     

 

·         Information relating to the financial or business affairs of any particular person (including the authority holding that information).

 

·         Information in respect of which a claim to legal professional privilege could be maintained in legal proceedings

Minutes:

RESOLVED

 

That the press and public be excluded from the remainder of the meeting as the items below, contain exempt information, as defined under paragraph 3 and 5, Part 1, schedule 12A of the Local Government Act:     

 

Information relating to the financial or business affairs of any particular person (including the authority holding that information).

 

Information in respect of which a claim to legal professional privilege could be maintained in legal proceedings

450.

Award of contract for the provision of bundled hours home support and reablement service

As per item 19.

Minutes:

As set out at Minute 443.

451.

Commercial Property Portfolio Review - Industrial Property Strategy and proposed acquisition of third party interest

As per item 20.

Minutes:

As set out at minute 444.

452.

Approval of construction contract at Antill Road Car Park - Land between 39-41 Antill Road N15

As per item 21.

Minutes:

As set out  in the exempt minutes and minute 445.

453.

Exempt minutes

To approve the exempt minutes of Cabinet on the 19th of January 2021.

Minutes:

RESOLVED

 

To approve the exempt minutes for the  meeting held on the 19th of January 2021.

454.

New Items of Exempt Urgent Business

To consider any items admitted at Item 3 above.

 

Minutes:

None