Agenda and draft minutes

Health and Wellbeing Board
Wednesday, 16th March, 2022 2.00 pm

Venue: 40 Cumberland Road, Wood Green N22 7SG. View directions

Contact: Nazyer Choudhury, Principal Committee Co-ordinator  020 8489 3321 Email: nazyer.choudhury@haringey.gov.uk

Note: To watch this meeting, use the link on the agenda frontsheet of click on this link: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3ameeting_YjA0MmRmYzctMmUzZS00YmEyLTgyOTItNzg1MjIxNTkwODBl%40thread.v2/0?context=%7b%22Tid%22%3a%226ddfa760-8cd5-44a8-8e48-d8ca487731c3%22%2c%22Oid%22%3a%22515ca3a4-dc98-4c16-9d83-85d643583e43%22%7d 

Items
No. Item

1.

FILMING AT MEETINGS

Please note this meeting may be filmed or recorded by the Council for live or subsequent broadcast via the Council’s internet site or by anyone attending the meeting using any communication method.  Members of the public participating in the meeting (e.g. making deputations, asking questions, making oral protests) should be aware that they are likely to be filmed, recorded or reported on.  By entering the ‘meeting room’, you are consenting to being filmed and to the possible use of those images and sound recordings.

 

The Chair of the meeting has the discretion to terminate or suspend filming or recording, if in his or her opinion continuation of the filming, recording or reporting would disrupt or prejudice the proceedings, infringe the rights of any individual, or may lead to the breach of a legal obligation by the Council.

Minutes:

The Chair referred to the filming of meetings and this information was noted.

 

2.

WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS pdf icon PDF 109 KB

Minutes:

The Chair welcomed everybody to the meeting. The Chair noted that as the meeting was not quorate, the meeting would proceed informally.

 

3.

APOLOGIES

To receive any apologies for absence.

Minutes:

Apologies had been received from Mr David Archibald, Mr Andy Donald and Cllr Mike Hakata.

 

4.

URGENT BUSINESS

The Chair will consider the admission of any late items of urgent business. (Late items will be considered under the agenda item where they appear. New items will be dealt with at agenda item 14).

 

Minutes:

There were no items of urgent business.

 

5.

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

A member with a disclosable pecuniary interest or a prejudicial interest in a matter who attends a meeting of the authority at which the matter is considered:

 

(i) must disclose the interest at the start of the meeting or when the interest becomes apparent, and

(ii) may not participate in any discussion or vote on the matter and must withdraw from the meeting room.

 

A member who discloses at a meeting a disclosable pecuniary interest which is not registered in the Register of Members’ Interests or the subject of a pending notification must notify the Monitoring Officer of the interest within 28 days of the disclosure.

 

Disclosable pecuniary interests, personal interests and prejudicial interests are defined at Paragraphs 5-7 and Appendix A of the Members’ Code of Conduct.

Minutes:

There were no declarations of interest.

 

6.

QUESTIONS, DEPUTATIONS, AND PETITIONS

To consider any requests received in accordance with Part 4, Section B, Paragraph 29 of the Council’s Constitution.

 

Minutes:

None received. 

 

7.

MINUTES pdf icon PDF 229 KB

To confirm and sign the minutes of the Health and Wellbeing Board meeting held on 26 January 2022 as a correct record.

 

Minutes:

RESOLVED: That the minutes of the meeting held on 26 January 2021 be confirmed as a correct record.

 

8.

NORTH CENTRAL LONDON COMMUNITY AND MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REVIEW pdf icon PDF 2 MB

To note a presentation on the North Central London Community and Mental Health Services Review.

Minutes:

Ms Joanne Murfitt introduced the item.

In response to questions relating to feedback from residents, Ms Murfitt informed the Board that:

·      It was helpful to spend time to hear residents’ views.

·      Some of the views expressed frustration regarding waiting times, partly regarding access to autism and ADHD assessments.

·      Money was being spent to reduce waiting times and examinations were being held on how services were being delivered.

·      Many people reported that transition from mental health to adult social services was very difficult and needed to be better prepared.

·      A system was required to be put in place to collect the information to see if the changes were making a difference.

·      People had also reported that it was frustrating and depressing to continuously repeat their story any time that they had a new intervention and perhaps a method of sharing records amongst professionals could be established.

 

The Board heard that:

 

·      It was often the case that those working in the health service were too busy to read patient notes and found it easier to ask the patient regarding their issue. Time needed to be given to staff to be able to read the notes. It may be possible to allow people an opportunity to tell their story via a short video.

·      It was important to keep in mind that when a patient was repeating a story, it was sometimes the case that the individual hearing the story was judging whether or not the patient should receive the service they were seeking.

·      In parts of the country such as Scotland, professionals were trauma informed and this had an impact on the way people accessed services in Scotland.

·      It was difficult for young people to transition through the mental health system as the criteria for the work was different in relation to adult mental health services.

·      Clinicians often wanted to hear the story and allow the patient the opportunity to repeat it as a retelling of the story often provided new information.

·      The trauma informed approach was built into how Whittington staff were being trained.

·      A gap analysis had been conducted by provider colleagues in each borough and their local commissioning leads. This assessed the core offer and examined whether or not it met the requirements.  There were variations found between boroughs. In relation to a central point of access, care coordination and trusted assessments, there were areas which were still in development.

·      It had not been possible to invest as much in Haringey and Enfield in relation to community services. There were many challenges regarding children services including issues regarding funding and implementation of processes.

·      One of process to be implemented was to use system investment to the community services. Discussions were proposed regarding the funding, priorities and local discussions about what that may mean practically and how best to implement them in Haringey. The Chair felt it was important to note the long-term effects of the resources gap and how that would interplay with the inequalities or disparities in the borough.  ...  view the full minutes text for item 8.

9.

NORTH CENTRAL LONDON INTEGRATED CARE SYSTEM, HEALTH AND CARE INTEGRATION WHITE PAPER AND ADULT SOCIAL CARE REFORM WHITE PAPER

To receive a verbal update on progress on the North Central London Integrated Care System and note the new integration white paper and adult social care reform white paper.  For reference links to the integration white paper and social care white paper are below:

 

Health and social care integration: joining up care for people, places and populations - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

 

People at the Heart of Care: adult social care reform - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

 

 

 

 

Minutes:

Ms Rachel Lissaur and Ms Charlotte Pomery introduced the item and provided a an overview of the documentation.

RESOLVED:

That the presentation be noted.

 

10.

LONG COVID-19 pdf icon PDF 692 KB

To note a presentation on Post COVID-19 Syndrome.

Minutes:

Mr Dan Windross and Mr Tom Leonard introduced the item.

The Board heard that:

 

·      This was a two-year project which was a few weeks and months into implementation with the Royal Free Hospital, NHS Charities and nine community grass roots organisations to provide a social model alongside clinical intervention.

·      Long Covid was subject to a spectrum of severity.  Awareness needed to be raised in areas such as employment, education and community activities.

·      During the coronavirus crises, medical professionals were able to harness and collect large quantities of data. There was an increasing number of people with long term conditions. This was an opportunity to invite people to report on a daily basis. Data could be quickly downloaded and information on the best treatments could be delivered promptly. The post covid clinic can help monitor the long-term conditions digitally.  

·      The number of people affected with long-covid in Haringey was likely to be a minor count of people as residents have had trouble accessing the health care system

·      Those suffering from long-covid have stated that they wish to be believed as many had not believed that they had ongoing symptoms and there was a feeling that GPs may not be considering the effect it had on people’s families.

·      Those suffering from long-covid also had a wide range of symptoms.

·      Some work could be done regarding the impact of long-covid on social care. There needed to be a way of linking health care and social care data.

·      It was an exciting opportunity to use the learning from long-covid and COVID-19 in general and to subsequently be able to apply that learning to other long-term conditions.

·      Some of the ways access to healthcare was being improved was by improving GP education. This was done by holding educational events. GPs were also filling in forms for long-covid. 

·      Attempts were being made to reduce waiting time for patients by improving staffing structure.

·      Plans had been discussed on how to approach deprived communities regarding long-covid.

·      There was a specific pathway for under 18s via local paediatricians

·      In relation to peer support, the Whittington had been testing a version of their expert patient programme for long-covid and it showed a significant impact on people's ability to manage their chronic disease.

·      A Living With Covid app was scheduled to be introduced.

·      A dedicated vocational rehab service in North Central London was being provided by the Royal Free Hospital. This could help people to get back to work, help with discussions with HR and about making adaptations. It was also starting to implement personal budgets through that so that people can get sort of personal health budgets, they can get a dedicated amount of money to support them in their return to work.

·      The clinic and the community services response times were monitored. There was a link between long covid and those with pre-existing long-term conditions.

 

RESOLVED:

That the presentation be noted.

 

11.

UPDATE ON WORK TO TACKLE RACISM AND INEQUALITIES IN HARINGEY

To receive an update on work to tackle racism and inequalities in Haringey.

Minutes:

Ms Charlotte Pomery provided an update to the meeting and informed that:

 

·      The first meeting of Somali Community Network which had positive motion. A housing survey had been undertaken which was well attended and a further one would take place.

·      Work was underway to support Ukrainian refugees. A meeting had been held on the local Ukrainians Support network

·      A Diversity in Public Realm meeting had been held which would help consider how to connect with the local community to celebrate diversity and how to connect with local communities.

 

RESOLVED:

That the update be noted.

 

12.

COVID-19 AND VACCINATIONS UPDATE

To receive a verbal update on the Covid-19 pandemic and the vaccination

programme

Minutes:

Dr Will Maimaris stated that coronavirus rates had fallen in the borough in the December – January period. In the last two-three weeks, there had been a rise in the figures mainly in the working age adult population. There had not been a significant increase in people becoming significantly ill. This had allowed the government to move into the Living With Covid phase. Vaccinations were still important and there would be a fourth vaccination recommendation for over 75s and those in high clinical vulnerability groups. There would be an offer for 5-11 year olds to be delivered in the community but not via schools. A vaccine bus wold be in operation between April to May. PCR testing and the office of national statistics survey were available to help provide a wider understanding of the breakdown of age groups. There would be long-term surveillance systems implemented but it was unlikely to reflect the level of detail available with mass testing.   Generally, vaccinations would protect individuals from contracting long-covid.

Countries around the world were relaxing restrictions, but the population had high levels of natural immunity or had been vaccinated. However, there could be increases in coronavirus rates due to ongoing mild strains of the virus.

 

RESOLVED:

That the update be noted.

 

13.

NEW ITEMS OF URGENT BUSINESS

To consider any new items of urgent business admitted at item 4 above.

Minutes:

There were no items of urgent business.

 

14.

FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS AND MEETING DATES

Members of the Board are invited to suggest future agenda items.

 

To note the dates of future meetings:

 

21 July 2021

22 September 2021

24 November 2021

26 January 2022

16 March 2022

Minutes:

The meeting noted further items to be submitted at upcoming meetings. These included a further item on Long Covid, Better Health Care Plan, Child and Adolescence Mental Health, Draft Health and Wellbeing Strategy, ICS and States and Workforce and Dental Care and Pharmaceutical Needs Assessment

An update on Localities and an Adults Approach for making every adult matter would be put forward.

The Chair thanked everybody for their hard work and dedication.